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Day 1:

Morning
Begin the day in Midtown with a tour the Margaret Mitchell House (the house where Mitchell lived while she wrote Gone with the Wind). After your history tour, walk a few blocks to the High Museum of Art. The Richard Meier-designed building and expansive campus houses some of the South’s most impressive art collections. See the concierge to arrange a private, curated tour of the museum. 

Lunch
Head to the Atlanta History Center and enjoy lunch at Swan Coach House before your afternoon exploration. Chicken Salad sandwiches and old-time fruit punch are on the menu here. 

Afternoon
After lunch, tour the Atlanta History Center museum dedicated to the city’s past, view exhibits on the Civil War, Centennial Olympics and even Bobby Jones golf history. Don’t miss touring the beautiful restored mansions and gardens on the property.

Dinner
After a busy day, retreat to your guestroom and enjoy dinner from the comfort of your room. Rest up for a second activity filled day.


Day 2:

Morning
Grab a house-made Cold Brew Coffee or cold-pressed juice and pastry from the Coffee Bar and make your way downtown to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. Allow yourself about 3 hours to really get the full experience. Sit at an old-time lunch counter and listen to the sit-in protests. It’s a moving experience like no other. Located just a few minutes away, tour Martin Luther King’s birth home in the Sweet Auburn district.

Lunch
Make your way Midtown to Mary Mac’s Tea Room for a traditional Southern experience. Serving homemade Southern fare since 1945, it is one of the remaining original tea rooms in Atlanta. 

Afternoon
After lunch take a stroll through the Atlanta Botanical Garden. See works of art made of stone, bronze, and glass installed throughout the beautiful gardens. Reflect on your trip at a peaceful spot next to the Lily Pond. 

End the day at the historic Oakland Cemetery with one of the many guided tours. The cemetery’s history dates back to 1850 and has connections to the Civil War. As you walk through, search for the oldest markers. The last spots were sold in 1884.