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New Orleans is a destination that has something for everyone. We have provided a local’s perspective on the city including neighborhoods to explore and sites not to be missed during a quick weekend stay. We look forward to sharing our city with you and cannot wait to see the #RCMemories you create.  


Tailgating Like A Local: Saints

When staying with us in New Orleans for a Saints game weekend, be sure to view our top suggestions for tailgating like a local and "Park & Play" with us.

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Tailgating Like A Local: LSU

When in the area during an LSE football weekend, be sure to view our top suggestions for tailgating like a local and "Treat You" to a stay with us at The Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans.

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Explore the Neighborhoods

New Orleans is comprised of several neighborhoods that are each unique and offer something distinctive. Download this guide to our favorite things in each area of Uptown, Mid-City, The Marigny, and more.

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Concierge Top 5

Our concierge recommends these top five must see destinations while visiting New Orleans.

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Two Days to Remember

We want to help you make the most of your weekend getaway by providing a 48 hour guide to New Orleans. Download this PDF for the perfect weekend filled with food, culture, and fun.

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Fun Historical Facts about New Orleans

1. New Orleans has been influenced by both our French and Spanish heritage, but the city was officially founded in 1718 by Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville.

2. Louisiana officially joined the United States in 1803 when Napoleon signed the Louisiana Purchase.

3. Since New Orleans sits on the Mississippi River, we take on the nickname “The Crescent City” for its winding crescent shape.

4. The city’s streets are names after royal houses in France and Catholic saints.

5. Canal Street was developed wider than other streets because it was a dividing line between two cultures (Creoles and Americans). There was supposed to be an actual canal that was built, but it never came to fruition. In fact, many streets change names after crossing Canal because the French and Spanish did not want to be forced to live with the Americans and English.