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South Beach Experience

Multifaceted and multicultural, Miami requires a few days to truly explore. Four days provides an opportunity for more than beach time and poolside cocktails (though there is time for that, too). Explore the city’s historic and up-and-coming neighborhoods, see art in museums and on the street and sample the work of some of the country’s best chefs.

Day

1

MORNING
  • TAKE A STROLL

    Set out with coffee in hand and head to the Miami Art Deco District to explore more than 900 preserved buildings.

  • JOIN A TOUR

    Get your bearings with a stop at the Art Deco Welcome Center, which offers walking tours focused on Miami history and architecture. Be sure to get a photo of Casa Casuarina, the former home of fashion designer Gianni Versace.

AFTERNOON
  • GRAB A BITE

    Stop for lunch and people-watching on Lincoln Road, one of the country’s first pedestrian malls. It was designed by Morris Lapidus, the architect responsible for the DiLido Hotel, which is now The Ritz-Carlton, South Beach.

  • PICK UP A GIFT

    Lincoln Road’s Books & Books is the city’s favorite independent bookstore and is just a few blocks from the palm tree-lined Española Way, a one-time artists’ colony that’s now home to galleries, bars and restaurants.

EVENING
  • TRAVEL BACK IN TIME

    Continue along Collins Avenue, where you’ll pass historic hotels including Eden Roc and Fontainbleu, both designed by Lapidus. Return to the hotel for a pre-dinner drink at the Prohibition era-inspired Lobby Bar.

  • EXCITE YOUR PALATE

    Like the city itself, the hotel’s Fuego y Mar is a blend of Latin American cultures including Mexico, Cuba, Venezuela and Colombia. The ocean-view restaurant prepares fresh, simple ingredients over an open flame.

Day

2

MORNING
  • PHOTO OP

    After breakfast, head to Wynwood, home to an impressive, ever-changing collection of Instagram-worthy street art.

AFTERNOON
  • THE HIGH LIFE

    Down the road, the Design District offers high-end shopping from the likes of Hermès and Prada. The neighborhood, once a pineapple farm, is now home to museums, galleries and renowned restaurants.

  • NO PASSPORT NEEDED

    Cuban culture is an integral part of Miami, and one can transport to Havana on Calle Ocho. Grab something sweet from Azucar Ice Cream Company before heading to Maximo Gomez Park to watch locals play dominoes.

EVENING
  • MIAMI VICES

    Before leaving Calle Ocho, stop into Little Havana Cigar Factory to see artisans at work and pick up a gift for yourself. Then, enjoy live music and a classic mojito at the Ball & Chain, open since 1935.

  • STREET FARE

    Head to Coyo Taco for dinner. Don’t miss the hidden bar in the back.

Day

3

MORNING
  • UNPLUG & INDULGE

    Wake up with a relaxing facial or massage at The Ritz-Carlton Spa, South Beach followed by pool time with a private cabana.

AFTERNOON
  • SEA TO SEE

    For lunch, stop into the hotel’s DiLido Beach Club for fresh seafood and a refreshing cocktail. Then, walk along South Beach where colorful lifeguard stands offer the perfect photo opp.

EVENING
  • TRAVEL WITH TASTE

    Head to Lincoln Road for dinner at Juvia, a rooftop restaurant known for its eclectic mix of Peruvian-, Japanese- and French-inspired dishes. The space is modern yet relaxed.

Day

4

MORNING
  • ABOVE WATER

    Head out via boat to Stiltsville, in the middle of Key Biscayne National Park, where stilted homes hold stories of old Miami. Take the narrated tour of Island Queen for interesting stories about the area’s history.

AFTERNOON
  • CULTURE VULTURE

    The building and view are as fascinating as the works inside the Perez Art Museum Miami. Next door, the Philip & Patricia Frost Museum of Science houses a 16 million-color planetarium.

  • BUILD UP AN APPETITE

    The museums are set within the 30-acre Museum Park, which makes for a great stroll before lunch with a bay view at Verde restaurant.

EVENING
  • END ON A HIGH NOTE

    Mark the end of your visit with dinner at one of Miami’s renowned restaurants: Seaspice along the Miami River or Vista Restaurant in Upper Buena Vista, a new area with boutiques and an 80-year-old sprawling oak tree.